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Celebrating World Landscape Architecture Month

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"The enjoyment of scenery employs the mind without fatigue and yet exercises it; tranquilizes it and yet enlivens it; and thus, through the influence of the mind over the body gives the effect of refreshing rest and reinvigoration to the whole system."
- Frederick Law Olmstead

Frederick Law Olmstead is the father of American Landscape Architecture. Among his celebrated designs are the US Capitol, the Biltmore House and Estate and New York's Central Park. His work and quotes are particularly poignant as we begin the month of April and celebrate World Landscape Architecture Month, a month-long celebration of landscape architecture and designed public and private spaces.

California's LaMesita Park is home to Modern City, GameTime's newest playground system that features a strong visual design.


GameTime is excited to celebrate World Landscape Architecture Month and help promote the landscape architect profession. Landscape architects design spaces that compliment the natural outdoor environment. Their projects often include harmonizing new designs of parks, playgrounds, campuses, trails and plazas with existing buildings and roads. Notably, they have a significant impact on communities and quality of life.

According to the International Federation of Landscape Architects, there are approximately 75,000 landscape architects across the world. In Canada, certain provinces regulate the profession of landscape architecture: Alberta, Ontario and British Columbia.

There are many ways that landscape architecture benefits communities. It promotes green infrastructure, which is shown to be more cost-effective than grey infrastructure. Landscape architect designs are often found in communities’ parks and green spaces, providing beautification while also encouraging people to be more active and spend time outdoors. The benefits of landscape architecture are truly multi-faceted: improving community health and demonstrating that nature can be as economical as it is beautiful and therapeutic.